Bhaso Ndzendze — Researcher in International Political Economy

Africa: The Continent we Construct

Front cover of Africa: The Continent we Construct. Image: Verity Publishers (Pretoria, 2015)

R350,00

Blurb

What is Africa? Whence it came? In Africa: The Continent we Construct, Bhaso Ndzendze voices how blatantly subjective interpretations of objective phenomena, essentially self-referential geopolitical understandings and historical presuppositions and assumptions have been used as bases upon which to construct the idea of ‘Africa’. In a range of interlocking, far-reaching and in-depth analyses, the author dwells on the real-world effects of this insulation of Africa, some of which may have come to greatly halt our economic and social progress, diminish the value of the individual and distort the process of historical pedagogy. While carrying out the task of addressing these issues, and the anxieties they inevitably conjure up, the book’s underlying narrative hymns the importance of critical thinking as well as a pragmatic approach to heritage and social engineering.

Table of Contents:

Acknowledgments – – – – – – iv
Preface – – – – – – ix
Epigraph – – – – – – xiii
 
Chapter One
Introduction – – – – – – 15
Chapter Two
The Continent We Construct – – – – 33
Chapter Three
What Have We Done! – – – – – 47
Chapter Four
Stay A While – – – – – 57
Chapter Five
Hegel and African Historiography – – – 63
Chapter Six
The Objectivist African – – – – 71
Chapter Seven
Africans in Togas – – – – – 79
Chapter Eight
What’s So Funny? – – – – – 87
Chapter Nine
In Picasso’s Studio – – – – – 95
Chapter Ten
Christianity and Africa: A Balance Sheet – – – 105
Conclusion – – – – – – 119
Appendix 1: A New Theory of Gravity – – – 122
Appendix 2: Platonic Forms: Against Imperialism – – 126
List of References – – – – – 130
Index – – – – – – – 125

Description:

This short book was the first serious work I ever published. Written during the whole of 2014, it was published in February of 2015 by Verity Publishers, a Pretoria-based publishing house.

The book is composed of a wide-range of topics, but by far the most provocative one is Chapter 4, entitled ‘Stay A While’. The chapter critiqued the notion of tourism as a sector in African countries. In the chapter, I sought to argue that there was really a counter-developmental impact as a result of foreigners wishing to see “the real Africa”. In truth what this “real Africa” encompasses is an undeveloped, forested, unchanged and stuck-in-time continent that is merely curated. Worse still, the incentives created by this presence of reward for doing nothing are heavy for the continent.